Book , Print in English , Chinese

Huang Di nei jing su wen : nature, knowledge, imagery in an ancient Chinese medical text, with an appendix, the doctrine of the five periods and six qi in the Huang Di nei jing su wen

Paul U. Unschuld.
  • Berkeley : University of California Press, 2003.
  • xii, 520 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Eisenhower M Level Reserves
    R127.1.S93 U57 2003 c. 1
    Available
  • Institute of the History of Medicine Books - Stack Level 6, Welch Library
    R127.1.S93 U59 2003 c. 1
    Available
Subjects
Medical Subjects
Local Subjects
Genre
  • Student Collection.
  • Early works.
Summary
  • "The Huang Di nei jing su wen, known familiarly as the Su wen, is a seminal text of ancient Chinese medicine, yet until now there has been no comprehensive, detailed analysis of its development and contents. At last Paul U. Unschuld offers entry into this still-vital artifact of China's cultural and intellectual past." "Unschuld traces the history of the Su wen to its origins in the final centuries B.C.E., when numerous authors wrote short medical essays to explain the foundations of human health and illness on the basis of the newly developed vessel theory. He examines the meaning of the title and the way the work has been received throughout Chinese medical history, both before and after the eleventh century when the text as it is known today emerged. Unschuld's survey of the contents includes illuminating discussions of the yin-yang and five-agents doctrines, the perception of the human body and its organs, qi and blood, pathogenic agents, concepts of disease and diagnosis, and a variety of therapies, including the new technique of acupuncture. An extensive appendix, furthermore, offers a detailed introduction to the complicated climatological theories of Wu yun Ilu qi ("five periods and six qi"), which were added to the Su wen by Wang Bing in the Tang era."--Jacket.
Contents
  • note: 1. Some Scholarly Views on the Origin of the Su wen
  • 2. References to HuangDi nei jing and Su wen in Early Bibliographic Sources
  • 1. Huang Di
  • 2. Nei
  • 3. Jing
  • 4. Su wen
  • 1. Huangfu Mi and the Jia yi jing
  • 2. Quan Yuanqi and the Su wen xun jie
  • 3. Yang Shangshan and the HuangDi nei jing tai su
  • 3.1. History and Reconstruction of a Tai su Text in Japan 2
  • 3.2. The Issue of the Chinese Master Copies of the Tai su 2
  • 3.3. Yang Shangshan's Commentaries
  • 4. Wang Bing's Su wen Edition of A.D. 762
  • 4.1. Wang Bing, His Intentions and His Preface
  • 4.2. Structural Characteristics of the Wang Bing Edition
  • 4.3. Discourses 66 through 74 in Today's Su wen
  • 4.4. The Influence of Wang Bing's Worldview on His Su wen Edition
  • 4.5. Scope and Structure of Wang Bing's Commentaries
  • 1. The Imperial Editorial Office of 1057
  • 2. The Scope of the Revision by Gao Baoheng et al.
  • 3. The Major Commentated Su wen Versions Subsequent to Gao Baoheng et al.
  • 3.1. Ma Shi's Huang Di nei jing su wen zhu zheng fa wei
  • 3.2. Wu Kun's Huang Di nei jing su wen zhu
  • 3.3. Zhang Jiebin's Lei jing
  • 3.4. Zhang Zhicong's Huang Di nei jing su wen ji zhu
  • 3.5. Gao Shishi's Huang Di su wen zhi jie
  • 3.6. Zhang Qi's Su wen shi yi
  • 3.7. Hu Shu's Huang Di nei jing su wen jiao yi
  • 3.8. Yu Yue's Nei jing bian yan
  • 4. Two Japanese Commentated Su wen Versions of the Edo Period
  • 4.1. Tamba Genkan's Su wen shi
  • 4.2. Tamba Genken's Su wen shao shi
  • 1. The Literary Setting
  • 2. The Yin-Yang Doctrine
  • 2.1. The Discovery of Dualism
  • 2.2. The Fourfold Subcategorization
  • 2.3. The Sixfold Subcategorization
  • 2.4. An Eightfold or Tenfold Subcategorization?
  • 2.5. Yin-Yang Physiology, Pathology, and Diagnosis
  • 3. The Five-Agents Doctrine
  • 3.1. General Remarks
  • 3.2. Early References to Pentic Categorizations
  • 3.3. Early Notions of Correspondences among Phenomena
  • 3.4. Early Patterns of Correspondences
  • 3.5. The Status Quo of the Five Agents Doctrine in the Su wen
  • 3.6. The Significance of the Five Agents Doctrine in the Su wen
  • 4. The Body and Its Organs
  • 4.1. Su wen Morphology
  • 4.2. Chest and Abdomen
  • 4.3. The Head
  • 4.4. The Extremities
  • 4.5. General Structural Elements and Mobile Agents
  • 4.6. Toward a Hierarchy of Human Organs
  • 4.7. Depots, Palaces, Containers, and Officers
  • 4.8. Links between Organs and Orifices
  • 4.9. The Organism as a System of Morphological Entities and Their Functions
  • 5. Blood and Qi
  • 5.1. Blood
  • 5.2. Qi
  • 5.3. Camp Qi and Protective Qi
  • 6. The Vessels
  • 6.1. Vessel Theory in the Mawangdui Manuscripts
  • 6.2. Vessel Morphology in the Su wen
  • 6.3. Vessel Pathology
  • 6.4. The Contents of the Vessels
  • 6.5. Vessel Flow
  • 7. Pathogenic Agents
  • 7-1. From Bugs and Demons to Natural Environmental Factors
  • 7.2. Wind Etiology and Pathology
  • 7.3. Wind Etiology and Leprosy
  • 7.4. Wind Etiology and Malaria
  • 7.5. Dampness, Cold, Heat, and Dryness
  • 8. Diseases
  • 8.1. Lifestyle and Prevention
  • 8.2. Ontological and Functional Views
  • 8.3. Disease Terminology
  • 8.4. Malaria
  • 8.5. Cough
  • 8.6. Lower Back Pain
  • 8.7. Limpness
  • 8.8. Block
  • 8.9. Recession
  • 8.10. Somatopsychic Diseases
  • 8.11. Beyond Conceptualization
  • 9. Examination
  • 9.1. General Principles
  • 9.2. Inspection
  • 9.3. Inquiries
  • 9.4. Three Sections and Nine Indicators
  • 9.5. Empirical and Conceptualized Prognosis
  • 9.6. Vessel Diagnosis of Disease
  • 9.7. Conclusion
  • 10. Invasive Therapies
  • 10.1. The Concept of Invasive Intervention
  • 10.2. Bloodletting
  • 10.3. Bloodletting to Treat Qi
  • 10.4. Misleading Piercing and Grand Piercing
  • 10.5. Genuine Qi Manipulation
  • 10.6. Morphological Piercing
  • 10.7. The Technique of Piercing
  • 11. Substance Therapies
  • 11.1. From Materia Medica to Pharmacology
  • 11.2. Pharmacotherapy in the Main Text of the Su wen
  • 11.3. Drug Qualities and Dietary Therapy
  • 11.4. The Dawn of Pharmacology in the "Seven Comprehensive Discourses"
  • 12. Heat Therapies
  • 12.1. Conceptual Levels prior to Vessel Theory
  • 12.2. Cauterization and Vessel Theory
  • 1. The Su wen: Document of a New Style of Thought
  • 2. Social Facts, Worldviews, and Medical Ideas: Parallel Structures
  • 3. Philosophical Key Terms in a Medical Context
  • 4. Conclusion.
Other information
  • Includes bibliographical references (pages 495-502) and index.
  • Language: Text includes some Chinese words.
  • OCLC
ISBN
  • 0520233220
  • 9780520233225
Identifying numbers
  • LCCN: 2002027170
  • OCLC: 50695107
  • OCLC: 50695107